inessential by Brent Simmons

December 2019

I can’t help but wonder if — given equivalent knowledge of UIKit and AppKit — iOS development isn’t harder now than Mac app development. At least for some kinds of apps.

Mac apps don’t have to deal with size classes, safe area insets, two very different classes of devices, getting killed by the system, a split view controller that isn’t suitable for some common purposes, presentation controllers, user activities, and — toughest of all — background app refreshing.

And some things that were Mac-only, such as multiple windows and contextual menus, are now iOS features too.

Even if I’m wrong, I can’t help but notice, as we work on NetNewsWire for iOS, that iOS development is starting to approach Mac-app-like complexity, and is already more complex in some areas.

Why I Listen to Podcasts at 1x Speed

On my microblog I mentioned that I always listen to podcasts at 1x speed.

Here’s why:

We’re in danger, I think, of treating everything as if it’s some measure of our productivity. Number of steps taken, emails replied-to, articles read, podcasts listened-to.

While accomplishing things — or just plain getting our work done — is important, it’s also important that not everything go in that bucket. The life where everything is measured is not really a full life: we need room for the un-measured, the not-obsessed-about, the casual, the fun-for-fun’s sake.

So I’m in no hurry. I will never, ever be caught up on all the podcasts I’d like to listen to. So, instead, I just play whatever I feel like whenever I feel like listening.

I’ll miss things, and that’s totally fine. But, in the meantime, I get to listen to the human voice somewhat close to realistically, with its the natural human pauses, with its rhythms and flows relatively unmediated and natural. Its warmth and music means so much more to me than being caught up.

But, again — I’m not saying this is right for you. But I would remind people that we have choices about what falls under productivity and what doesn’t.

The Apple Curtain

I’m always happy for a friend when they start a job at Apple — but I’m also sad when it means they have to stop their community activities: no more podcasting and blogging, developer meetup organizing, presenting at conferences, writing side-project apps, contributing to open source things.

Another friend of mine at Apple, who worked in an area relevant to some trouble we were having with NetNewsWire, wanted to look at the source code – and they had to go ask permission before they could even look.

I understand! I understand why Apple PR and legal departments are the way they are. But I still feel a loss to the community every time somebody I know goes to work at Apple.

There’s a curtain between us and them. Colorful, well-designed, made by lasers — but still a curtain.

PS This would even prevent me from ever working there. I have a great job, and I intend to stay at this job till I retire, but if I were unemployed and saw the openings in Apple developer publications based here in Seattle, I totally would have applied. Except that working there would have meant the end of NetNewsWire and, effectively, the end of this blog. I would have had to give up the two biggest pillars of my career. It’s flat-out not worth it.

PPS I don’t write this to make any of my friends feel guilty! Working at Apple is a wonderful thing. But it’s bittersweet, and I do wish Apple would do more to take out the bitter part.